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Current Trends in Science and Technology

an Open Access Publication ISSN: 0976-9730 | 0976-9498

Botany (Plant Science)

Induction of Callus and Preliminary Phytochemical Profiling from Callus of Artemisia absinthium L. and Artemisia pallens Wall

Yatoo Ghulam Mohiuddin
Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Botany, S. G. B. Amravati, University, Amravati- 444602 (MS) India.
Varsha Nitin Nathar
Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Botany, S. G. B. Amravati, University, Amravati- 444602 (MS) India
Wagay Nasir Aziz
Botany Research Laboratory, Vidya Bharati Mahavidyalya, Amravati- 444602 (MS) India.
Nikhil Babruwahan Gaikwad
In-vitro cultures produce higher amounts of secondary metabolites as compared to intact plant. Hence, attempts were made with an aim to study phytochemical analysis of callus from Artemisia absinthium and Artemisia pallens for the presence of various secondary metabolites. Callus was induced from leaf explants of Artemisia absinthium and Artemisia pallens by using various plant growth regulators singly or in combination. The maximum callogenic response of 100 % was shown at 0.75 mg/l NAA, 0.5 mg/l NAA, 0.5+0.5 mg/l 2,4-D+NAA and 1+0.5 mg/l 2,4-D+NAA respectively from leaves of A. absinthium. In Artemisia pallens, out of the growth regulators employed, the maximum callogenic response of 92 % was observed at 2 mg/l Kinetin from leaf explants. The callus indicated the presence of important secondary metabolites like alkaloids, phenols, steroids, tannins, glycosides and terpenoids in the Methanol, Dichloromethane and Petroleum ether extracts.
Online First: February 01, 2018
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Abstract

In-vitro cultures produce higher amounts of secondary metabolites as compared to intact plant. Hence, attempts were made with an aim to study phytochemical analysis of callus from Artemisia absinthium and Artemisia pallens for the presence of various secondary metabolites. Callus was induced from leaf explants of Artemisia absinthium and Artemisia pallens by using various plant growth regulators singly or in combination. The maximum callogenic response of 100 % was shown at 0.75 mg/l NAA, 0.5 mg/l NAA, 0.5+0.5 mg/l 2,4-D+NAA and 1+0.5 mg/l 2,4-D+NAA respectively from leaves of A. absinthium. In Artemisia pallens, out of the growth regulators employed, the maximum callogenic response of 92 % was observed at 2 mg/l Kinetin from leaf explants. The callus indicated the presence of important secondary metabolites like alkaloids, phenols, steroids, tannins, glycosides and terpenoids in the Methanol, Dichloromethane and Petroleum ether extracts. 

Keyword : Artemisia absinthium, Artemisia pallens, callus, Plant Growth regulator, secondary metabolites.

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Feb 1, 2018
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References

1. Drury, R. A.; Wallington E. A.: “Carleton's histological technique”. 5th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press (1980). 2. Erichsen-Brown, C., Use of Plants for the Past 500 Years. Aurora, Ontario, Canada (1979). 3. Guarrera, P. M. (2005). Traditional phytotherapy in Central Italy (Marche, Abruzzo, and Latium). Fitoterapia, 76: 1-25. 4. Hammer, K. A., Carson, C. F., Riley, T. V. (1999). Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts, J. Appl. Microbiol, 86 (6):985. 5. Harborne, J. B. Phytochemical methods, 1st Edition, London: Chapman and Hall, Ltd. pp: 49-188 (1973). 6. Kaul, V. K., Nigam, S. S. & Banerjee A. K. (1978). Insecticidal activity of some essential oils. Indian J. Pharm., 40: 22-24. 7. Kokate, C. K., Purohit, A. P. & Gokhale, S. B. (2005). Pharmacognosy. Nirali Prakashan, Pune. 8. Lin, L. C., Nalawade, S. M., Mulabagal, V., Yeh, M. S., Tsay, H. S. (2003). Micropropagation of Polygonum multiflorum THUNB and quantitative analysis of the anthraquinones emodin and physcion formed in in-vitro propagated shoots and plants. Biol Pharm Bull. 26 (10):1467-1471. 9. Martindale. The Extra Pharmacopoeia. 29th edition. The Pharmaceutical Press London, 1989 McArthur, E.D. & A. Plummer. (1978). Biogeography and management of the native western shrubs: A case study, section Tridentatae of Artemisia. Great Basin Naturalist. 2: 229-243. 10. Misra, L. N. Amitabh, C. Raghunath, S. T. (1991). Fragrant Components of oil from Artemisia pallens. Phytochemistry. 2, 549-552. 11. Morton, J. F. (1981). Atlas of medicinal plants of Middle America. Charles C. Thomas, Springfield, IL. 12. Murashige, T. & Skoog, F. (1962). A revised medium for rapid growth and bioassays with tobacco tissue cultures. Physiol Plant., 15: 473-497. 13. Roja, G. & Rao, P. S. (2000). Anticancer compounds from tissue cultures of medicinal plant. J Herbs, Spices. Med., Plants. 7: 71-102. 14. Suresh, J., Elango, K., Dhanabal, S. P., Paramakrishnan, N., Suresh, B. (2007). A comparative pharmacognostical studies of Artemisia species found in Nilgiris biosphere. Anc Sci Life. 27(2): 7-13. 15. Tan, R. X., Zheng, W. F. & Tang, H. Q. (1998). Biologically active substances from the genus Artemisia. Planta Med., 64: 295-302. 16. Wagay, N. A., Khan, N. A., & Rothe, S. P. (2017). Profiling of secondary metabolites and antimicrobial activity of Crateva religiosa G. Forst. Bark - A rare medicinal plant of Maharashtra India. International Journal of Biosciences 10 (5): 343-354.
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References

1. Drury, R. A.; Wallington E. A.: “Carleton's histological technique”. 5th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press (1980).
2. Erichsen-Brown, C., Use of Plants for the Past 500 Years. Aurora, Ontario, Canada (1979).
3. Guarrera, P. M. (2005). Traditional phytotherapy in Central Italy (Marche, Abruzzo, and Latium). Fitoterapia, 76: 1-25.
4. Hammer, K. A., Carson, C. F., Riley, T. V. (1999). Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts, J. Appl. Microbiol, 86 (6):985.
5. Harborne, J. B. Phytochemical methods, 1st Edition, London: Chapman and Hall, Ltd. pp: 49-188 (1973).
6. Kaul, V. K., Nigam, S. S. & Banerjee A. K. (1978). Insecticidal activity of some essential oils. Indian J. Pharm., 40: 22-24.
7. Kokate, C. K., Purohit, A. P. & Gokhale, S. B. (2005). Pharmacognosy. Nirali Prakashan, Pune.
8. Lin, L. C., Nalawade, S. M., Mulabagal, V., Yeh, M. S., Tsay, H. S. (2003). Micropropagation of Polygonum multiflorum THUNB and quantitative analysis of the anthraquinones emodin and physcion formed in in-vitro propagated shoots and plants. Biol Pharm Bull. 26 (10):1467-1471.
9. Martindale. The Extra Pharmacopoeia. 29th edition. The Pharmaceutical Press London, 1989 McArthur, E.D. & A. Plummer. (1978). Biogeography and management of the native western shrubs: A case study, section Tridentatae of Artemisia. Great Basin Naturalist. 2: 229-243.
10. Misra, L. N. Amitabh, C. Raghunath, S. T. (1991). Fragrant Components of oil from Artemisia pallens. Phytochemistry. 2, 549-552.
11. Morton, J. F. (1981). Atlas of medicinal plants of Middle America. Charles C. Thomas, Springfield, IL.
12. Murashige, T. & Skoog, F. (1962). A revised medium for rapid growth and bioassays with tobacco tissue cultures. Physiol Plant., 15: 473-497.
13. Roja, G. & Rao, P. S. (2000). Anticancer compounds from tissue cultures of medicinal plant. J Herbs, Spices. Med., Plants. 7: 71-102.
14. Suresh, J., Elango, K., Dhanabal, S. P., Paramakrishnan, N., Suresh, B. (2007). A comparative pharmacognostical studies of Artemisia species found in Nilgiris biosphere. Anc Sci Life. 27(2): 7-13.
15. Tan, R. X., Zheng, W. F. & Tang, H. Q. (1998). Biologically active substances from the genus Artemisia. Planta Med., 64: 295-302.
16. Wagay, N. A., Khan, N. A., & Rothe, S. P. (2017). Profiling of secondary metabolites and antimicrobial activity of Crateva religiosa G. Forst. Bark - A rare medicinal plant of Maharashtra India. International Journal of Biosciences 10 (5): 343-354.
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