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Current Trends in Science and Technology

an Open Access Publication ISSN: 0976-9730 | 0976-9498

Engineering and Technology

Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis of a Wing Stiffened Panel

Chethan I C
Assistant Professor, Dept of Aeronautical Engineering, Srinivas Institute of Technology, Karnataka.Corresponding Author
Lokesh K S
Assistant Professor, Dept of Mechanical Engineering, Srinivas Institute of Technology, Karnataka.
Online First: January 16, 2018
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Abstract

Cracking in the aircraft structure is a common phenomenon. If the cracks are unnoticed then, it may lead to catastrophic failure of the structure. Fatigue cracks will appear at the high tensile stress locations. Cutouts and fastener locations in the tensile stress field will experience high tensile stress because of the stress concentration. During its service operation, fatigue cracks initiate at critical locations of the airframe. These cracks grow under the variable amplitude service loading. If undetected and unrepaired, these cracks will grow to their critical sizes, which will result in a catastrophic structural failure.


In the current study a stiffened panel from a wing of transport aircraft is considered. A wing box structure will be analysed to obtain the overall response of the structure for given loading condition. A local analysis will be carried out for a panel at the bottom skin with multiple stringers. The stress analysis of the stiffened panel is carried out to identify the fatigue cracking location. A variable amplitude service loading for a transport aircraft will be considered to derive the local stress history at the fatigue cracking location. A crack growth model under variable amplitude loading will be developed. This model will use the constant amplitude fatigue crack growth data in order to compute crack extension per cycle.


Crack arrest capability of the stiffener perpendicular to the cracking direction will be established analytically. The required material fatigue crack growth rate is calculated.

Keyword : Wing Box structures; Finite element analysis; Stress analysis; Fatigue; SIF; Fatigue crack growth;

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Jan 16, 2018
Published
Jan 16, 2018
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References

1. Benachour N., Hadjoui A., Benachour M., Benguediab M., “Stress ratio and notch effect on fatigue crack initiation and propagation in 2024 al-alloy”, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 79, 2011. 2. Amardeep M. Bhiwapure', H.V. Lakshminarayana', K.K. Brahma, “Assessment of Cracked Stiffened Panels using Fracture Mechanics” SAsTECH Vol.VI, No.2, September 2007. 3. R.J. Atkinson, etc al, “Behaviour of Skin Fatigue Cracks at the Corners of Windows in a Comet 1 Fuselage” Presented to The deputy controller aircraft (R&D),Ministry of Aviation, June 1960. 4. S.M.O. Tavares*, P.M.G.P. Moreira*, S.D. Pastrama**, P.M.S.T. Castro, “STRESS Intensity Factors by Numerical Evaluation in Cracked Structures”, * Department of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Management, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Portugal ** Department of Strength of Materials, University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania 5. Zhou Hongliang, “Calculation of stress intensity factors with the modified virtual crack closure technique”, Institute of Structural Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, MianYang, China. 6. Girish KE, Venkatesha BK and Suresh BS, “Analytical Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Arrest Capability in Fuselage of Large Transport Aircraft” Bangalore Aircraft Industries Ltd. 7. Abdullah S., Giacomin J.A. and Yates J.R., “Identification of fatigue damaging events using a wavelet-based fatigue data editing algorithm” Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sheffield Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD, United Kingdom. 8. Schijve Jaap, “Fatigue Damage In Aircraft Structures, Not Wanted, But Tolerated?” First International Conference on Damage Tolerance of Aircraft Structures, Delft University Of Technology, the Netherlands. 9. Goranson Ulf G., “Fatigue Issues In Aircraft Maintenance and Repairs”, Elsevier Int. J. For Fatigue Vol. 20, No. 6, year 1997, pp. 413–431. 10. Elżbieta Gadalinska, “Calculation and Experimental Verification of Residual Stresses In Riveted Joints Used In An Airframe”, Fatigue Of Aircraft Structures Vol. 1 (2010) 23-36 Institute Of Aviation, Warsaw, Poland. 11. Campbell G. S. and Lahey R., “A survey of serious aircraft accidents involving fatigue fracture”, Int. J. of Fatigue, Vol. 6 No. 1 January 1984, ISBN01421123/84/010025-06. 12. Stevanmaksimovic, “Fatigue Life Analysis of Aircraft Structural Components”, Scientific-Technical Review, Vol.4, No.1, 2005.
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References

1. Benachour N., Hadjoui A., Benachour M., Benguediab M., “Stress ratio and notch effect on fatigue crack initiation and propagation in 2024 al-alloy”, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 79, 2011.
2. Amardeep M. Bhiwapure', H.V. Lakshminarayana', K.K. Brahma, “Assessment of Cracked Stiffened Panels using Fracture Mechanics” SAsTECH Vol.VI, No.2, September 2007.
3. R.J. Atkinson, etc al, “Behaviour of Skin Fatigue Cracks at the Corners of Windows in a Comet 1 Fuselage” Presented to The deputy controller aircraft (R&D),Ministry of Aviation, June 1960.
4. S.M.O. Tavares*, P.M.G.P. Moreira*, S.D. Pastrama**, P.M.S.T. Castro, “STRESS Intensity Factors by Numerical Evaluation in Cracked Structures”, * Department of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Management, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Portugal ** Department of Strength of Materials, University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania
5. Zhou Hongliang, “Calculation of stress intensity factors with the modified virtual crack closure technique”, Institute of Structural Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, MianYang, China.
6. Girish KE, Venkatesha BK and Suresh BS, “Analytical Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Arrest Capability in Fuselage of Large Transport Aircraft” Bangalore Aircraft Industries Ltd.
7. Abdullah S., Giacomin J.A. and Yates J.R., “Identification of fatigue damaging events using a wavelet-based fatigue data editing algorithm” Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sheffield Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD, United Kingdom.
8. Schijve Jaap, “Fatigue Damage In Aircraft Structures, Not Wanted, But Tolerated?” First International Conference on Damage Tolerance of Aircraft Structures, Delft University Of Technology, the Netherlands.
9. Goranson Ulf G., “Fatigue Issues In Aircraft Maintenance and Repairs”, Elsevier Int. J. For Fatigue Vol. 20, No. 6, year 1997, pp. 413–431.
10. Elżbieta Gadalinska, “Calculation and Experimental Verification of Residual Stresses In Riveted Joints Used In An Airframe”, Fatigue Of Aircraft Structures Vol. 1 (2010) 23-36 Institute Of Aviation, Warsaw, Poland.
11. Campbell G. S. and Lahey R., “A survey of serious aircraft accidents involving fatigue fracture”, Int. J. of Fatigue, Vol. 6 No. 1 January 1984, ISBN01421123/84/010025-06.
12. Stevanmaksimovic, “Fatigue Life Analysis of Aircraft Structural Components”, Scientific-Technical Review, Vol.4, No.1, 2005.
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